Square Pianos

While it is true that that the piano market is flooded with used instruments, the opportunity to select a fine piano from the showroom of an experienced rebuilder is your assurance of finding quality. I try to offer pianos for a variety of needs, to fit a range of budgets.

I am lucky to have many opportunities to acquire quality pianos in prime shape for reconditioning. Turning away most, I focus on finding the best instruments to match the needs of my clients. Every piano that passes through the shop receives several tunings at A=440, replacement, improvement, and regulation of the musical and moving action parts as needed, and work to maximize the exterior appearance.

Beyond that, my selection includes special “featured” pianos that have had the most thorough restoration.

“They just don’t make them like they used to.” It’s a truth we have all heard before. Sure, you could buy a great new piano, but in many ways, a restored vintage piano will offer features that are simply no longer readily available, such as rare veneers and art cases, not to mention the tonal advantage of full size upright pianos versus smaller modern models.

“Rebuilt, reconditioned, remanufactured, like new, complete restoration” these are all terms that are often applied to the type of work I do. I use some of them myself. Honestly, I find them to be confusing at best, and deceptive at worst. Is a vintage piano “like new” if it has been retro fitted with non-original parts? Not every piano part is even subject to wear; the cast iron plate is just one example. For these reasons I invite you to explore the descriptions of what has actually been done in the process of making these pianos whole again rather than relying on ambiguous terminology. If you have any question regarding any of these offerings, please ask.

I can easily make arrangements for professional delivery anywhere.

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